Scene Study – Character development and role preparation

Scene Study – Character development and role preparation

Scene Study – Character development and role preparation. Heightened listening and truthful responding Cold Reading. All scenes are assigned by the teacher. The scenes are either from plays or film and television scripts. The material and role is always something for the actor to sink their teeth into. We believe in stretching our actors and also making sure the actor is nailing the types of roles they would book. When actors are truly improvising within a scene, it appears professionally directed. The goal of scene work is to have improvisational freedom within the scene. The actor applies everything learned in technique and improv work. After performing the scene the actor is given very detailed notes by the teacher.

Scene study also covers the basics: objectives, actions, beats, script analysis, given circumstances, character development, emotional preparation, language, and consistent through line. The goal is as good as the actor gets in improv work they should also be in a written scene.

New Studio Location

Call Us

(844) 5-ACTING
or, (844) 522-8464

Email Us

ActingSD@gmail.com

Visit Us

(By Appointment Only)

6142 Nancy Ridge Drive Ste 102,
San Diego, CA 92121

Improv work – Meisner – Cassavetes

Improv work – Meisner – Cassavetes

Improv work is one of the main thrusts of the studio training. This original improv work is based on language of the Meisner technique and the raw realness from filmmaker John Cassavetes New York Acting workshops of the 60’s. Andrew Benne writes all the fresh content improv situations, often writing custom improvs specifically for each actor and the personal breakthroughs he or she needs to have. The purpose is to live truthfully within imaginary circumstances. The training process of doing these film and Television style improvs is beyond fun. The actors usually receive their improv information via a video tailored made just for them. Essentially the improv works just like a script – each actor gets common knowledge shared by the scene partners and private knowledge that their partner does not know. The focus is for the actors to truly believe that the situation is really happening at that particular moment, and to work off the behavior of each other, as opposed to playing the story. Actors learn to trust their preparation as opposed to playing it. It’s about complete freedom in the world of the script and actors trusting their authentic instincts in order to behave organically in the conflicts of the script. Many improvs are written for three actors as well as two person scenes. We design this intentionally for the actors to learn how to work as an ensemble, a necessity to working in film and television. We are sticklers for realistic relationships and the subtleties of the human condition, whether comical or tragic. Improvisational freedom in the work is the goal.Improv work is one of the main thrusts of the studio training. This original improv work is based on language of the Meisner technique and the raw realness from filmmaker John Cassavetes New York Acting workshops of the 60’s. Andrew Benne writes all the fresh content improv situations, often writing custom improvs specifically for each actor and the personal breakthroughs he or she needs to have.

The purpose is to live truthfully within imaginary circumstances. The training process of doing these film and Television style improvs is beyond fun. The actors usually receive their improv information via a video tailored made just for them. Essentially the improv works just like a script – each actor gets common knowledge shared by the scene partners and private knowledge that their partner does not know. The focus is for the actors to truly believe that the situation is really happening at that particular moment, and to work off the behavior of each other, as opposed to playing the story. Actors learn to trust their preparation as opposed to playing it. It’s about complete freedom in the world of the script and actors trusting their authentic instincts in order to behave organically in the conflicts of the script.

Many improvs are written for three actors as well as two person scenes. We design this intentionally for the actors to learn how to work as an ensemble, a necessity to working in film and television. We are sticklers for realistic relationships and the subtleties of the human condition, whether comical or tragic. Improvisational freedom in the work is the goal.

New Studio Location

Call Us

(844) 5-ACTING
or, (844) 522-8464

Email Us

ActingSD@gmail.com

Visit Us

(By Appointment Only)

6142 Nancy Ridge Drive Ste 102,
San Diego, CA 92121

Emotional Preparation

Emotional Preparation

Learning to emotionally prepare is taught in the classes. How to be detailed and truthfully specific. Developing specifics and a vivid imagination takes time and is an organic personal process for each actor. How to have daydreams which cause transformation in the actor’s inner life. Emotional preparation is not about making “head” choices of how to be in the scene, but to let the script and your imagination take you over- consume you. When you are fully emotionally prepared your behavior and body will respond in the world of your script.

New Studio Location

Call Us

(844) 5-ACTING
or, (844) 522-8464

Email Us

ActingSD@gmail.com

Visit Us

(By Appointment Only)

6142 Nancy Ridge Drive Ste 102,
San Diego, CA 92121

Behavior

Behavior

Behavior, both with props and with other actors. Out of each moment and each situation human behavior arises. The work is focused more on how human beings behave than what they say. We believe there is much more screen time spent without spoken dialogue than with. We teach the Unspoken Word, we feel that much of film and television acting is about what is not being said.

New Studio Location

Call Us

(844) 5-ACTING
or, (844) 522-8464

Email Us

ActingSD@gmail.com

Visit Us

(By Appointment Only)

6142 Nancy Ridge Drive Ste 102,
San Diego, CA 92121